Category: Uncategorized

TRINITY

Posted by – August 9, 2012

Among the things I love about my career in photography are the many places it’s taken me, like to the northern New Mexico desert, a land where the light is so magical it inspired the likes of Ansel Adams, and every local license plate proclaims, “Land of Enchantment.”

I was there taking this picture of international interns at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, 50 years to the day that the first nuclear weapon, nicknamed “The Gadget,” was detonated at nearby Trinity in the Jornada del Muerto desert, Spanish for “journey of death.”

Standing at the obelisk that commemorates the event — 50 years to the minute since July 16, 1945 — was spooky and sobering.  Believe me, the desert landscape set the scene for some deep reflection.

The Los Alamos National Laboratory facility was first created to house the Manhattan Project, code name for the project to weaponize the newly discovered theory known as “the nature of atoms.”  Upon witnessing the successful detonation of the device, the onsite head of the project, Robert Oppenheimer, quoted Bhagavad Gita, exclaiming: “I am  become Death, the destroyer of worlds.”

But I think the potential consequences of that day were best summed up by Albert Einstein when he said, “I know not with what weapons WW III will be fought, but WW IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

STICK TO THY LAST

Posted by – January 25, 2012

According to legend, the old idiom, “Stick to your last,” originated with Apelles, a painter in Ancient Greece.  As the story goes, a shoemaker found fault with one of Apelles’ works, saying the shoe was incorrectly portrayed.  When Apelles rectified the mistake, the cobbler then pointed out an error in the leg, thus elliciting from Apelles this-now-infamous admonishment: “Shoemaker, do not go above your last.”

Usually, “sticking to what you do best” is sage advice, however every business has a life cycle — birth, growth and maturity — often followed by “death” in companies that fail to adapt to change.  Nothing epitomizes this more than the demise of Eastman Kodak.  “Big Yellow,” the once-revered photographic giant, has fallen into chapter 11 bankruptcy.  By the way, a “last” is by definition, rigid and inflexible.  Draw your own conclusions.

No person or company wants to be considered “over the hill,” but when you do come to a hill, you either go over it, around it or backwards, or you stop altogether.  Conquering a hill often involves substantial investments in time and financial resources; in fact, just moving forward requires continuing to learn and grow.  Some people and some companies just don’t have that in them, and Darwin’s theory eventually rules the day.

Awhile back, I originally created the accompanying image for Texas Boot Co.  It was intended to epitomize and glorify hand-made craftsmanship.  I shot it on the large-format color transparency film, Kodak EPP.  I later “re-purposed” it with advanced contemporary techniques, employing a hi-res drum scan, multiple layers of textures and Photoshop CS 5.

Ever onward, over the next hill.

OLD DOME, NEW TRICK

Posted by – September 13, 2011

The ceiling of the rotunda of the Old Courthouse in St. Louis has hovered over events that shaped history since the Italian-Renaissance dome (modeled after St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican) was renovated in 1864.

It was in this very building in 1846 that the slave, Dred Scott, sued for his and his wife’s freedom on the grounds that they had previously lived in free states.  Ultimately, the U.S. Supreme Court decided the case in 1857 and ruled against Scott.  The decision polarized the nation and moved history one step closer to the first shots of the American Civil War.

I photographed the rotunda’s ceiling using a relatively new digital technique called High Dynamic Range (HDR) that combines a range of exposures of identically framed images (think Ansel Adams, only in color), so the resulting composite image more accurately represents all the tonal ranges the human eye can see at one time.  The technique is especially useful for photographing high-contrast, static subjects such as architectural interiors.

The Old Courthouse was standing long before digital manipulation even became possible and will endure way beyond the latest cover of Communication Arts.

A LEGEND NEVER DIES

Posted by – August 16, 2011

When an automobile accident left Max Starkloff a quadriplegic at age 21, his family sent him to a rural nursing home where he quickly concluded, “This is no way to spend a life.”  He then began to conceptualize the idea that a disabled person could live independently.

This is my portrait of Max.  I worked with him when I had the opportunity to collaborate with a group of creatives to promote Paraquad, the organization Max founded.  Among its many successes, Paraquad helped push passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.

Max was a relentless crusader and tenacious watchdog for the disabled.  He met with three standing US presidents in an effort to promote barrier-free access to businesses and homes.  Max’s tireless efforts helped St. Louis become the first city in the country to install lifts on city buses.  Due in part to his efforts, St. Louis also built wheelchair-accessible sidewalks, improved general accessibility and provided parking for the disabled.  Max also helped promote assistive technologies and employment opportunities that help people with disabilities fully participate in society.

Max’s immortal soul left his broken body on December 27, 2010.  He was known for what he could do — not what he couldn’t do — but he never wanted to be considered a hero.  So I’ll just say he was an extraordinarily ordinary person whose accomplishments will live forever.

BRIGHT IDEA

Posted by – July 18, 2011

This montage shot pays tribute to “The Wizard of Menlo Park,” Thomas Alva Edison, the third-most-prolific inventor in history. (Geek Alert: the montage was accomplished using five view cameras set up in the studio, moving the film holder from set to set, layering the exposures.  I also utilized in-camera-masking, gaff tape, gobos and incantations to the gods of benevolent serendipity.

Edison’s many inventions, such as the phonograph, the motion picture camera and, most notable to me, the incandescent light bulb, continue to influence life around the world.

Light is essential to how I make a living (“photography” actually means “writing with light”). It is my master and I am its willing servant. So I’m acutely aware that familiar tungsten light bulb is due to be phased out in the US by 2014, making way for more energy-efficient alternatives.  In addition to saving money the new “bulbs” are supposed to lower greenhouse gasses.

What was once considered to be a stroke of genius now seems destined for the scrap heap of history.  They tell me this is a good thing and it probably is, but have you ever tried to snuggle down with a good book in the glow of a florescent tube that resembles an ice cream cone?  The cyan transmission does drive the darkness away, but it seems to chase the romance out of the room, as well.

What would Edison think?  History gives us a clue: he would have re-invented the light bulb decades ago, using the same perseverance and ingenuity that enabled him to invent the light bulb in the first place.

Fear not the future.

A CAPITAL LOSS

Posted by – July 5, 2011

I grew up in Kentucky, just across the Ohio River from Shawneetown, Illinois.  At the time, the legal drinking age in Illinois was 18, but the local watering holes had a very liberal interpretation of that statute.  We misspent more than a few nights of our youth there, contributing to the local economy at places like Hog Daddy’s Saloon, which at that time were about all the remaining commerce the dying town had.

Among our many misconceptions was that Shawneetown was the first sate capital.  Actually, it was home to the first bank charted in Illinois.  In addition to other dubious distinctions from its municipal past, the town had refused to buy the first bonds issued by the City of Chicago, stating, “No city located that far from a navigable river could survive.”  This picture is actually of the town’s second bank, considered to be a fine example of Greek revival architecture.

At one time, this US Government center for the Northwest Territory was an integral link to the new frontier.  Lewis and Clark may (or may not) have slept here.  It was one of only two towns chartered by the Federal Government, the other being Washington, D.C.

Today, the river that was once the town’s ally has become the town’s enemy.  The series of locks, dams, levees and floodwalls that made our rivers commercially viable have made small towns like Shawneetown susceptible to flooding.  Think Cairo, IL.  Many have simply closed their City Halls and called it quits.

When I went back to shoot this photo, I discovered that even Hog Daddy’s Saloon had closed.  These are hard times for small towns.


REST IN PEACE (AND IN PLACE)

Posted by – June 9, 2011

Beneath the streets of Paris lies an expansive network of catacombs riddling the dark netherworld throughout the vestiges of what originally were the city’s stone quarries.  I first learned of this vast underground ossuary while I was shooting on location in Paris for a medical-company client, and just had to see it for myself.

With a little “finagling” by a local supplier, I got special permission to visit this vast denizen-of-the-dead — population, about six million.  This multitude of deceased humanity was reinterred there in the interest of public health after being mass-exhumed from the city’s overflowing, perpetually re-used public cemeteries.  This change of address was prompted by the city’s expansion beyond the former edges of town where commoners traditionally were buried.  (Location, location, location.)  Later, the bones were more reverently arranged and the tunnels more-adorned as befitting a sepulcher.


DOO-DA, DOO-DA

Posted by – April 27, 2011

It was the first Saturday in May, 1973, and the sun was shining brightly when Secretariat made his glorious, record-breaking run for the roses. He broke last, made his move in the backstretch, then ran every successive quarter faster than the previous one. He was still “moving up” when he streaked across the wire, winning by 2 1/2 lengths.

Secretariat became the first Triple Crown Winner in 25 years, setting new race records in two of the three events in the series – the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont Stakes, records that still stand today. What an athlete!

On that great day in May I had unfettered access to not only Secretariat, but to Jimmy Stuart and, oh yeah The Queen of England, thanks to a press pass from the State of Kentucky (my summer employer) and my Hilton Hotel windbreaker that just happened to match the windbreakers worn by the CBS TV Crew.

It was a nice gig for a little ol’ country-boy who had just come to the big city and was trying to get by. Looking back 38 years, Pilgrim and The Great Horse are gone, but Her Royal Highness and I are still in the race.

PREFERRED SEATING

Posted by – April 1, 2011

Soon after moving to St. Louis, I discovered “The Muny.”  For the uninitiated, The Muny is also known as “The Municipal Theatre” in Forest Park, America’s oldest and largest outdoor musical theatre.

Toting a bottle of cheap wine, we’d arrive early so we could sit in the free seats. Summer after summer, The Muny entertained us with its perennial parade of classic musicals, and consequently, I unexpectedly became fond of show tunes.  (Don’t tell anyone.)

This photo, however, has little to do with that.  It was shot from very expensive box seats and later photo-composed to insert the actors in the foreground.  The show that night was “Singin’ in the Rain,” and yes, The Muny made it rain onstage.

It was part of a campaign to raise money for, of all things, new seats.

Rock Star

Posted by – March 7, 2011

We photographers often are lucky enough to get to take pictures of important, famous people and places, flashing our VIP passes to access the inner sanctums of celebrity, fame, elite business, science and technology, and cherished history.  I admit, it makes you feel special. But as photographers, we also have rewarding opportunities to get to know real people, people like Ronnie.  Ronnie works hard.  He’s doggedly tenacious.  He has dreams, and he busts his butt to make them come true for himself.  Ronnie is incredibly successful at our most-important job, being human.  He’s a rock star.